Youth Art Contest

Endangered Species Youth Art Contest

Congratulations to our 2021 winners and thank you to everyone who entered!

Join us for our 4th annual Endangered Species Youth Art Contest! In celebration of Endangered Species Day (May 21, 2021) Roger Williams Park Zoo is accepting art entries from local K-12 grade students and homeschoolers in the New England area depicting threatened/endangered species. Endangered Species Day is an opportunity to raise awareness about the importance of protecting endangered species, their habitats, and learn what we can do to help protect them. Winners will be contacted by email on Thursday, May 20th. See below for complete contest guidelines, past winners, prize packages, and submission instructions.

Thank you to our co-Sponsor

 

Art Contest Guidelines
Endangered Species Day is an opportunity to celebrate the importance of protecting endangered species and learning what you can do to protect them.
Rules & Art Submission Instructions:


Hawksbill Sea Turtle - Julia Medeiros (9-12)

  • All entries are to be submitted electronically.
  • Students’ artwork must be original. Computer-generated and traced images will NOT be judged.
  • All artwork must depict threatened/endangered species.
  • Each art entry must also include a short explaination as to why saving your chosen species/subject from extinction is important.
  • Deadline: Entries must be received by April 30, 2021. Late entries will not be judged.

Submit Your Artwork >

Please Note: All artwork becomes the property of Roger Williams Park Zoo. Submission of the artwork grants the Zoo a non-exclusive, royalty-free license to publish your student’s/child’s artwork in our editorial, educational, and promotional print and digital materials, and on social media. All published artwork will be credited "Artist’s Name.”

2021 Contest Prizes
  • GRAND PRIZE: A Roger Williams Park Zoo family membership (a $129 value), and a $100 gift card to Jerry's Artarama of Providence.

  • GRADE CATEGORY WINNERS:  (Grades K-2, Grades 3-5, Grades 6-8, and Grades 9-12) Each grade-winner shall receive a family four (4) pack of tickets to RWPZoo and a $25 gift card to Jerry's Artarama of Providence.

  • HONORABLE MENTIONS:  (Grades K-2, Grades 3-5, Grades 6-8, and Grades 9-12) Each grade-honorable mention shall receive an award certificate.

All winners will have their artwork custom framed by Jerry's Artarama of Providence and will be displayed in the Zoo's Hasbro's Our Big Backyard exhibit until May 2022. Artwork will also be highlighted on the Zoo's website and social media pages, and in the Zoo's summer WILD Magazine issue.

 

Past Winning Entries
2021 Winners

The Zoo's 4th annual art contest received over 330 art submissions from talented local students from all across New England - the most entries to date! Each child detailed the importance of saving endangered/threatened species and a passion for conserving wildlife. A huge round of applause to everyone who submitted! 


2021 Grand Prize Winner:


Ateles paniscus (red-faced spider monkey)  - Ke Qing Tan (9-12)
Why is saving this species important to you? The population of the red-faced spider monkey has declined more than 30% in recent years, fueled by the destruction of tropical rainforests and hunting. They play a crucial role in seed dispersal, helping to diversify the plants in their environment. We must contribute to conservation efforts and raise awareness to prevent this fascinating species from becoming more endangered than they already are.


2021 Winning Entries by Grade Category:


Aye-aye - Alia Koasanto (K-2)
Why is saving this species important to you? It's important to save the aye-ayes because they are strangely cool and cute. And I want many people to continue to see them.


Ara glaucogularis (blue-throated macaw) - Olivia Nowak (3-5)
Why is saving this species important to you? The blue-throated macaw is endangered because there are only about 250-300 left in the wild. These beautiful birds are helpful for forest regeneration because they drop seeds while feeding.  Humans are the biggest threat to them because they capture them for the pet trade and land clearance on cattle ranches. Educating people, planting trees, and providing nesting boxes will help protect the blue throated macaw and keep them from extinction.


Red Panda - Samantha Thibeault (6-8)
Why is saving this species important to you? Saving Red Pandas is important to me because only around 10,000 adult Red pandas are left, with an estimation of only 2,500 left in their native habitat.  Hundreds of Red pandas are killed each year because of their habitat being destroyed or of people killing them for their coats.  If we could stop these things from happening, we could save Red Pandas from going extinct.


Phillipine Crocodile, Tiger - Genevieve Steever (9-12)
Why is saving this species important to you? Crocodiles and tigers are both animals that are at the top of the food chain, and yet their numbers are dwindling. The Phillipine crocodile is critically endangered due to exploitation and unsustainable fishing methods. Tigers have lost 93% of their historical range, and are currently endangered due to poaching, habitat framentation, and habitat destruction. Both predators are critical for balancing and managing prey populations, and are in desperate need of help.


Grade Category Semi-finalists:


Blue Whale - Ella Leveille  (K-2)
Why is saving this species important to you? The ocean is my favorite place. I do not like pollution. If the Blue Whale were extinct other sharks and fish would be extinct too. I want to be a Marine Biologist.


New Guinea Singing Dog - Catherine H. (3-5)
Why is saving this species important to you? The New Guinea Singing Dog was thought to be extinct for 50 years. Then, in 2016, some scientists found 15 of them in Papua, Gasberg near a gold and copper mine. The dogs numbers have slowly been going up.These dogs have been alive for 6,000 years and I think they should live many more.


Apteryx  (kiwi) - Juliana Lopes  (6-8)
Why is saving this species important to you? Kiwi’s are a species of flightless bird that are near-threatened. All of the species of Kiwi have been negatively affected by deforestation, and their greatest threat for survival is predation by invasive mammalian predators. Although they have very strange features, they are very beautiful birds. There are about 68,000 Kiwi’s left in the world. Every year, we loose 2% of our Kiwi population.


Polar Bear - Alyssa Hiener (9-12)
Why is saving this species important to you? Saving the polar bear species is important to me because I have always connected with polar bears. Growing up with a sibling truly shaped me as a person and I could not imagine losing them. Learning that only one of the two polar bear cubs will usually survive broke my heart. No child or cub should ever have to lose their sibling.

Thank you again to everyone who entered and congratulations to the winning artists! We look forward to next year's Art Contest for even more talented submissions.

2020 Winners

The Zoo's 3nd annual art contest received over 250 art submissions from talented local students from all across New England! Each child detailed the importance of saving endangered/threatened species and a passion for conserving wildlife. A huge round of applause to everyone who submitted! Check out the winning artwork displayed in the Zoo's Hasbro's Our Big Backyard.


2020 Grand Prize Winner:


Sumatran Orangutan - Dayeon Lee (6-8)
Why is saving this species important to you? Sumatran Orangutans are critically endangered mostly because of habitat loss. Their habitat is being destroyed by human activity to be converted to palm oil plantations. Saving orangutans are important because they play a vital role in seed dispersing to create a healthy environment. Even though numbers of population are decreasing, we still have a chance to stop extinction if we start now.


2020 Winning Entries by Grade Category:


Koala - Charlotte Healy (K-2)
Why is saving this species important to you? "I really like Koala Bears because they're so cute."


Brown bat - Elena Hoffey (3-5)
Why is saving this species important to you? When I was born, the little brown bat was one of the most common bats in North America. Now they are in danger of going extinct because of a disease called white-nose syndrome. White-nose syndrome is caused by a fungus and has no cure. The little brown bat is very important for controlling the insect population. It is an amazing animal and we are so lucky to have it on our planet and we should try to keep it here.


Red Wolf - Mackenzie Casto (6-8)
Why is saving this species important to you? Red wolves are very important to save because they are very unique in that they are half coyote and half wolf.  Wolves are a keystone species that are extremely important to maintain a balance in an ecosystem.  Wolves can restore ecosystems to healthy levels.


Tiger - Sanchali Pothuru (9-12)
Why is saving this species important to you? A century ago, 50,000 to 80,000 tigers roamed India alone.  However, today, a mere 3,500 tigers are thought to remain worldwide.  Even with protection under various laws and regulations, the tiger population is still dwindling.  The burden of this issue lies upon tiger poachers as tiger parts are desired for medicinal purposes in several cultures.  Attention needs to be brought to this matter before it becomes too late.


Grade Category Semi-finalists:


Red Wolf - Jacob Roberge  (K-2)
Why is saving this species important to you? The red wolf is important for our ecosystem.   They also bring in tourists to the areas they live in which helps bring in money for those areas.


Red Panda - Olivia Yijie-chen (3-5)
Why is saving this species important to you? It is important to save the Red Panda because they are such a gentle kind animals. When I look at them it give me warm fuzzy feeling. If we don't protect now the future generations will not be able to enjoyed the special privilege like I have now. I draw this picture so I can enjoyed It at house when I want to see it.


West Indian Manatee - Sarah Schrank  (6-8)
Why is saving this species important to you? Although the West Indian Manatee does not really have any natural predators, their population is decreasing. This is due to hazards such as collisions with boats, and the destruction of their nesting sites due to developments built along waterways. These manatees play an important role in their ecosystem, which is why it is important that we don't let them go extinct. They're considered a keystone species, meaning that they help many other organisms in their environment, and if they were to go extinct, it would have a large, negative effect on their ecosystem.


New Zealand Sea Lion - Alania Frias (9-12)
Why is saving this species important to you? The New Zealand Sea Lion is one of the rarest breeds in the species history, and according to the New Zealand Department of Conservation has a population of around only 12,000. One of the most threatening things to this breed are fisheries that operate within or around the foraging area of the Sea Lions. They are known to accidentally capture these creatures when hunting fish for commercial use, and this often results in death. Greater safety protocols are needed to help save these gentle giants from the very possible extinction they are facing.

Thank you again to everyone who entered and congratulations to the winning artists! We look forward to next year's Art Contest for even more talented submissions.

2019 Winners

The Zoo's 2nd annual art contest received over 220 art submissions from talented local students from all across New England! Each child detailed the importance of saving endangered/threatened species and a passion for conserving wildlife. A huge round of applause to everyone who submitted! Check out the winning artwork displayed in the Zoo's Hasbro's Our Big Backyard.


2019 Grand Prize Winner:

Pangolin - Chloe Guo (9-12)
Why is saving this species important to you? Pangolins are one of the most trafficked mammals in the world, yet nobody knows about them. According to WildAid.org, over 100,000 pangolins are poached from the wild, and the number living in the wild is dwindling. The beautiful, large scales that cover their bodies are the reason for poaching; they have been used in many traditional medicines in both Asia and in Africa. Pangolins are classified as an endangered species, and the only way to stop them from becoming extinct is by raising awareness of their existence.


2019 Winning Entries by Grade Category:


Amur Leopard - Shreya Choudhary (K-2)
Why is saving this species important to you? It is important to save Amur Leopard because it will keep the food chain balanced.


Atelopus varius aka the clown frog - Eric Shih (3-5)
Why is saving this species important to you? We should protect Atelopus varius and any endangered species because they are all important to the food chain.  Because if an animal becomes extinct, then the food chain will be unbalanced.  If the food chain is unbalanced, everything will be chaos, that is why we have to protect endangered animals.


American Burying Beetle - Nathan Bessette (6-8)
Why is saving this species important to you? Saving the American Burying Beetle is important to me because Rhode Island is one of the few states that this species still survives in.  They are decomposers of dead plants and animals which is very helpful to the ecosystem.  They also feed on fly eggs and larvae which keeps the fly population down.


Amur Leopard - Sophia Hopkins (9-12)
Why is saving this species important to you? Amur Leopards are now classified as a critically endangered species, and this is largely caused by humans. They are commonly the victims of poaching by humans for their pelts. It is important that we recognize that humans have had a major role in the endangerment of this animal. With less than 100 amur leopards left, it is crucial that we take action to save this species


Grade Category Semi-finalists:


Red Panda - Avery Marnane (K-2)
Why is saving this species important to you? It’s important to not use their fur because they are almost going to be extinct.  I don’t want them to get hurt and die.  It’s important to not kill animals.  I love to watch red pandas and I feel happy when they are around.


Chimpanzee - Jack Ragosta (3-5)
Why is saving this species important to you? I think saving chimpanzees is important because they can teach us a lot of things. They are also very nice animals if you are nice to them. If you do not harm them they won't harm you!


Mastchie's Tree Kangaroo - Mackenzie Casto (6-8)
Why is saving this species important to you? Saving all endangered animals is important to our environment. With over 100 types of marsupials, tree kangaroos are one of the most endangered. The Matschie Tree kangaroo is endangered because people are cutting down the trees they live in and also hunting them for food and for their fur.  If we want a healthy environment we need to protect all wildlife and their habitats. I also think they are really cute!


Indri - Sarah LeClair (9-12)
Why is saving this species important to you? The call of the indri reverberated in my soul when I first heard it through the perspective of the BBC series Planet Earth II (which, when I discovered it, I watched rather obsessively). I saw from a screen the indri’s sharp and expressive stare, rich with the colors of the place it calls home, and its eyes spoke to me more deeply than any human word ever could. The local people of Madagascar say that the indri are our brothers, and their call is so haunting because it reminds us that we once depended on the forest, too, and that one day we must return to the world we have abandoned.

Thank you again to everyone who entered and congratulations to the winning artists! We look forward to next year's Art Contest for even more talented submissions.

2018 Winners

In celebration of Endangered Species Day, Roger Williams Park Zoo, hosted its first ever Endangered Species Youth Art Contest in 2018. The Zoo received over 150 art submissions from talented local students from all across New England! Each child detailed the importance of saving endangered/threatened species and a passion for conserving wildlife. A huge round of applause to everyone who submitted! Check out the winning artwork displayed in the Zoo's Hasbro's Our Big Backyard.


2018 Winning Entries by Grade Category:


Three-toed sloth - Grace Alfano (K-2)


Hawksbill Sea Turtle - Zachary Leone (3-5)


Red Wolf - Leila Toubia (6-8)


Wolf - Sydney Lague (9-12)


2018 Grade Category Semi-finalists:


Red Panda - Lillian Savaria (K-2)


Red Wolf - Caroline Charland (3-5)


Rufa Red Knot - Ella Zhu (6-8)


Hawksbill Sea Turtle - Julia Medeiros (9-12)


Southern Right Whale - Nathaniel Riggs (9-12)

Thank you again to everyone who entered and congratulations to the winning artists! We look forward to next year's Art Contest for even more talented submissions.